Raymond Orbach

of University of Texas at Austin

Raymond Lee Orbach was nominated by President Bush to serve as the first Under Secretary for Science at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a post created by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. On May 26, 2006, Dr. Orbach was unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate and sworn in as Under Secretary on June 1, 2006.

As Under Secretary, Dr. Orbach's primary responsibility was to serve as chief scientist for DOE, and to advise the Secretary of Energy on a variety of topics. In addition to these duties, Dr. Orbach was also responsible for leading the Department's implementation of the American Competitiveness Initiative, designed to help drive continued U.S. economic growth. He was also responsible for leading the Department's efforts to transfer technologies from DOE national laboratories and facilities to the global marketplace, serving as Chair of the Technology Transfer Policy Board, responsible for coordinating and implementing the Department's technology transfer and activities. He is currently director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin.

Later this week, the U.S. Senate will consider H.R. 1, the federal budget bill approved by the House of Representatives earlier this month. The bill calls for $60 billion in budget cuts, including massive reductions within the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science. Left intact, the cuts would effectively end America’s status as the…

Building a Clean Energy Economy University Research Essential to Transformational Changes Raymond L. Orbach Director, Energy Institute at UT Austin In his recent State of the Union address, President Obama challenged the nation to produce 80% of the country’s electricity from clean energy sources by 2035. Such investments are critical, he said, because “the nation…

The most recent attempt to establish universal standards for ethical issues in global science was developed as part of the 2nd World Conference on Research Integrity, held 21-24 July 2010, in Singapore. The “Singapore Statement on Research Integrity” seeks to set forth a set of principles and accompanying responsibilities to guide ethics in science on…

Elementary school children are taught that photosynthesis is the basis for life on Earth.  Plants take carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, water and sunlight, and produce useful chemical energy – their “fuel” for growth and reproduction.  But is it possible to create synthetic photosynthesis? Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin believe it…

As scientists assess mounting evidence of a new geologic epoch where human activities will largely control the evolution of our Earth’s environment, they have coined this epoch, “The Anthropocene.” Don’t look now, but you’re living in it.   What we don’t know is whether our influence on climate during the Anthropocene will be a short-term, relatively…