Pete Danko

Pete Danko is a writer and editor based in Portland, Ore. His work has appeared in Wired, The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle and elsewhere.

Comments Off on New Report Ranks the World’s ‘Greenest’ Utilities

By one measure – and measuring this sort of thing can get pretty complicated – the world’s biggest energy providers got a whole lot greener in 2013. The publication EI New Energy, in releasing its third annual compilation of the “Top 100 Green Utilities” (PDF), said emissions-free sources accounted for 80 percent of the new energy generating capacity added…

Comments Off on Mass Efficiency: Bay State Best In Saving Energy, Again

Massachusetts held the top spot for the fourth consecutive year and North Dakota again brought up the rear in the latest annual assessment of state energy efficiency efforts. In between, there was a lot of movement on the 2014 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard, both positive and negative – Arkansas leaped six places to 31st, while…

Comments Off on Does the EPA’s Carbon Plan Short-Change Renewables? New Report Suggests Yes

Detractors have called the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed limits on power plant emissions onerous and unachievable, but the Union of Concerned Scientists is out with a report that does more than fend off those claims. The group says the Clean Power Plan could go much further than it does in cutting carbon, simply by properly accounting for the demonstrated…

A year after adding the term “polar vortex” to their vocabulary – and feeling its biting financial impact – Americans can look forward to spending less money to keep their homes warm this winter, whether they heat with natural gas, fuel oil, propane, or electricity, government energy-watchers said on Tuesday. The key driver behind the…

Like a lot of technologies that might be enlisted in the fight against climate change, carbon capture has faced a bit of a chicken-and-egg dilemma, castigated by skeptics as unproven yet given little opportunity to demonstrate its efficacy on a large scale. That begins to change today with the opening of the Boundary Dam Carbon…

Comments Off on U.S. Forecast Sees Rising Global Oil Appetite, Led by China

Consumption of liquid fuels—petroleum, mainly—will stabilize or even fall a bit over the coming quarter century in the places that have long used the lion’s share, like the United States, Europe and Japan. But with large increases in China, India and the Middle East, global consumption will rise even more than previously thought, U.S. energy…

It’s not your imagination – you have been paying more for electricity this year. Driven by large increases in the Northeast, U.S. residential electricity prices took their biggest leap in five years during the first six months of this year, the government said on Tuesday. The U.S. Energy Information Administration said pinpointing all the factors…

If last week’s news that the U.S. Department of Commerce was imposing new duties on Chinese solar imports left you with a bad case of déjà vu, or at least wondering if the story would ever end, that’s understandable. It’s been a long-running melodrama. Oregon-based SolarWorld Industries America, a division of the German company SolarWorld, got…

Germany is the winner and the United States, although showing some signs of progress, remains far from the top rung. World Cup soccer? Yes, but also energy efficiency efforts, according to new rankings released on Thursday. Based on both policy and performance, the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy’s International Scorecard put Germany first among…

The price of electricity isn’t bad in Georgia—26 percent lower than the national average, by one measure. But as a new study shows, when it comes to the energy-cost line in U.S. consumer budgets, there’s a lot more to it than how many cents per kilowatt hour the local utility charges. WalletHub, a personal and…