Archives for October, 2014

Comments Off on Poll Finds Generation Gap on Energy Issues as Millennials Voice Climate Concerns

As voters head to the polls Tuesday, new research finds a generation gap on energy issues as millennials show greater concern about climate change. Two-thirds of young adults (aged 18 to 34) say they’re inclined to vote for a political candidate who supports cutting greenhouse gas emissions and increasing financial incentives for renewable energy, according…

After more than a two-year hiatus, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is once again renewing licenses for aging nuclear power plants. The independent federal agency gave a 20-year license renewal on Oct. 20 to Limerick Generating Station Units 1 and 2 near Philadelphia and is now reviewing renewal applications for 17 additional reactors, including Indian…

Located in the North Coast region of the Canadian province of British Columbia, the traditional territory of the Haisla Nation has found itself at the center of Canada’s energy and international commerce debate. Ellis Ross was elected Chief Councilor of the Haisla Nation in 2011 and re-elected by acclamation to a four-year term in 2013.…

Comments Off on Paying for Protection Is Part of the Cost of Doing Business for Oil and Gas Firms in Egypt

From the frequent breakdowns in security to successive governments’ non-payment of company dues, oil and gas firms in Egypt have had a rough ride over the past few years. But for those operating in the country’s sparsely populated interior, no chore has proven as taxing as satisfying the Sahara Desert’s native inhabitants. For centuries, roaming…

Comments Off on New Report Ranks the World’s ‘Greenest’ Utilities

By one measure – and measuring this sort of thing can get pretty complicated – the world’s biggest energy providers got a whole lot greener in 2013. The publication EI New Energy, in releasing its third annual compilation of the “Top 100 Green Utilities” (PDF), said emissions-free sources accounted for 80 percent of the new energy generating capacity added…

Comments Off on Mass Efficiency: Bay State Best In Saving Energy, Again

Massachusetts held the top spot for the fourth consecutive year and North Dakota again brought up the rear in the latest annual assessment of state energy efficiency efforts. In between, there was a lot of movement on the 2014 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard, both positive and negative – Arkansas leaped six places to 31st, while…

Thought leaders from across Japan’s energy sector gathered in Tokyo to discuss the role energy will play in adapting the country’s cities to a challenging environment of aging and declining population and increasing dependence on foreign sources for food and fuel. Tokyo-Yokohama, the world’s largest urban concentration, is already in many ways in the vanguard of the future of urban centers. What happens in this mega city is being watched closely across the planet for ideas to emulate or avoid.

Comments Off on Production Begins at Second U.S. Cellulosic Biofuel Facility

You don’t often hear Kansas and Spain mentioned in the same sentence. Yet today Spanish company Abengoa is bringing another big cellulosic biofuel facility online in Hugoton, a small community in the Southwest corner of the state. This is the second big plant starting up this year, showing that after some predictable yet highly scrutinized…

Comments Off on New Gas Plant Venture Aims at Carbon Capture From a Different Angle

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is often promoted as a way for coal power to be made “clean”: Projects such as the in-progress Kemper power plant in Mississippi and the recently announced Petra Nova project in Texas aim to trap the carbon dioxide from burning coal and then store it into underground storage or into…

Comments Off on Your Pants Might Charge Your Phone One Day, Suggests New Tiny-Generator Study

Billing the breakthrough as the “world’s smallest electric generator,” scientists have found a way to translate kinetic energy into power using a material no thicker than a layer of atoms.  Researchers imagine that the bendable, stretchable material could be woven into clothing that might power body sensors, medical devices, or a phone in your pocket.…

Loan guarantees have been around since at least the 1940s, when the U.S. government backed loans for homes, farms and businesses for World War II veterans. More recently, the U.S. government has used loan guarantee programs to support the development of clean energy. Projects including the large Ivanpah solar facility in California’s Mojave Desert, a…

Comments Off on Does the EPA’s Carbon Plan Short-Change Renewables? New Report Suggests Yes

Detractors have called the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed limits on power plant emissions onerous and unachievable, but the Union of Concerned Scientists is out with a report that does more than fend off those claims. The group says the Clean Power Plan could go much further than it does in cutting carbon, simply by properly accounting for the demonstrated…

Cutting the U.S. greenhouse gas emissions that stoke climate change could save billions in energy costs and boost revenue for the natural gas industry, according to a new report from the World Resources Institute, a research organization that advocates for environmental sustainability. The report, Seeing Is Believing, focuses on five areas that account for 55…

Comments Off on Methane Hot Spot in U.S. Predates Fracking Boom, Study Says

An area in the U.S. Southwest that’s about half the size of Connecticut has emitted the country’s largest concentration of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, according to a new analysis of satellite data. The study, which was released jointly by the American Geophysical Union and NASA, found that between 2003 and 2009, the area released…

What happens when a manager of Naval Facilities Energy Initiatives decides to go “net zero” on his home in Washington, D.C.? You get a true zero-energy home, done right on a budget. Andrew Knox wanted to “walk the walk” of energy efficiency, so he and his wife, Elizabeth, had some decisions to make.  To attain…

Comments Off on U.S. Fuel Economy Hit New Highs With 2013 Models

American cars are using less gas per mile and emitting less carbon dioxide than ever before, according to a government analysis released Wednesday. The average fuel economy of 2013 models is 27.6 miles per gallon for cars and 19.8 miles per gallon for trucks, “both of which are all-time highs,” said the report from the…

A year after adding the term “polar vortex” to their vocabulary – and feeling its biting financial impact – Americans can look forward to spending less money to keep their homes warm this winter, whether they heat with natural gas, fuel oil, propane, or electricity, government energy-watchers said on Tuesday. The key driver behind the…

Last week a solar power company based in Australia announced plans to build the world’s first heart-shaped solar field in New Caledonia, a French island in the South Pacific that currently gets most of its energy from coal, oil, and gas. The “heart shape” of Conergy’s forthcoming solar installation was inspired by the neighboring topography…

Like a lot of technologies that might be enlisted in the fight against climate change, carbon capture has faced a bit of a chicken-and-egg dilemma, castigated by skeptics as unproven yet given little opportunity to demonstrate its efficacy on a large scale. That begins to change today with the opening of the Boundary Dam Carbon…