Archives for April, 2013

Comments Off on If It’s Good for Schools, Will It Be Good for Energy?

Imitation, they say, is the sincerest form of flattery. But is duplicating “Race to the Top” the way to get a new energy grid up and running? If you don’t keep track of education policy, Race to the Top is the Obama administration’s signature schools initiative, with $4 billion in federal grant money awarded to…

Comments Off on Greenhouse Gas Emissions: EPA Cries Foul on Keystone, Gov. Forecasts Fall Short

Two news items surrounding greenhouse gas emissions moved over the past week. One on the trajectory of said emissions from government number-crunching. The other on what the proposed Keystone pipeline might mean for emissions.

Comments Off on For Military, a Solar Energy Solution Lightens the Load and Could Save Lives

  The great military book is from early China, The Art of War. There is no art of soldiering. You heavy up, go for a walk, look for trouble for a few hours. Or days.  Pete Newell is a U.S. Army colonel. Soldiering doesn’t change, he says. Technology does.  “The average weight on a soldier’s…

Renewable Energy Not Growing as Fast as Necessary, Reports Say

On the road to more sustainable, clean energy, the ride has been bumpy. That’s the message to two reports this week—one from the International Energy Agency and one from the Pew Environment Group—that measured progress on transitioning from fossil fuels to clean energy. Renewable energy has stalled, both analyses point out, for a few different…

We’ve known for months that 2012 was a huge year for wind power in the United States, so the headline from the wind industry’s big annual report released last week – that wind power grew by 28 percent – was a little stale. But poring over the 108-page document – provided to us on a…

Comments Off on Purdue’s ‘Cinderella Story’ at the Race

This being my first year attending Shell Eco-marathon, I didn’t expect anything more than what my club members had told me. A hectic schedule, few hours of sleep, and sunshine filled days was all I expected. What ensued encompassed my expectations and then continued far beyond when our story turned into what a neighboring team…

Peak Oil Flip-Flop

There’s a new twist in the “peak oil” debate. Is it good news for the climate? Peak Oil Question Remains, Debate Continues Ever since M. King Hubbert advanced the theory of peak oil in 1956, experts and non-experts alike have been debating about timing and relevance. (See here, here, here and here.) Hubbert’s argument seems like a…

Comments Off on Asia’s Accelerating Energy Revolution: India

So what about the country that—together with China—is responsible for 76 percent of the world’s planned 1.4 trillion watts of coal-fired power plants and 90 percent of the projected growth in global coal demand to 2016; that plans (implausibly) to build a coal-fired plant fleet twice as big as America’s; and that will ultimately surpass China in population, though one-fourth of its people still lack electricity?

Comments Off on Outlook for Gas Prices: A Bit Lower This Summer

Gasoline prices for U.S. drivers will be about six cents lower on average this summer compared to last year, according to a new forecast. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) predicts that the average retail price for a gallon of regular gasoline will be $3.63, compared to $3.69 last year. That’s only a slight bump up…

Comments Off on Asia’s Accelerating Energy Revolution: China

China is the world’s #1 energy user and carbon emitter, accounting for 55 percent of world energy-consumption growth during 2000–2011. Yet China now also leads the world in five renewable technologies (wind, photovoltaics, small hydro, solar water heaters, and biogas) and aims to lead in all.