Archives for November, 2011

Comments Off on Tanzania Struggles to Tap Natural Gas Potential

Despite a yawning deficit in energy supply that has plunged Tanzania into a serious electricity crisis, the country has failed to tap the massive potential of recently discovered natural gas stores. Although the government is boasting of major gas discoveries in the country’s offshore fields, very little investment is already under way to supply gas…

The Obama administration delayed deciding whether to approve the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which has been proposed to carry tar sands from Canada to Texas’s Gulf Coast. The administration said it should consider alternate routes and wait until early 2013 to decide. Industry officials in Canada thought the delay may derail the pipeline, and threaten…

Five Ways to Make Recycling Pay

America Recycles Day (ARD) is today, November 15; it is the only nationally recognized day dedicated to the promotion of recycling. Although this is a step in the right direction, we need ARD to be every day. The average American throws away 1,600 pounds of trash each year. That’s 4.4 pounds daily! Recycling is actually…

Comments Off on Can APEC Deal Help COP17 Climate Change Talks?

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) countries may become a good example of how to deal politically with deadlocking issues. At their summit in Honolulu last week, they agreed to reduce import tariffs to boost trade in products that cut fossil fuel use and reduce pollution.  With dismal expectations for the COP17 climate change talks, which…

Dominion Virginia Power has restarted the first of two nuclear reactors at the North Anna Power Station in Louisa County, Va., for the first time since a 5.8-magnitude earthquake struck the area on August 23. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission granted the company permission to restart the reactors on Friday. The quake’s epicenter was just…

Comments Off on Using Sustainable Water to Plan for the Next Billion

Last week, Danica May Camacho of the Philippines became the world’s symbolic seven billionth person. The occasion drew mixed feelings in the policy world — what does a booming global population mean for climate risks? To cite one issue, leaders are worried about the declining supply of water in regions vital to economic growth. This…

As a superstorm of historic proportions slams Alaska’s West Coast, one of the low-lying villages at grave risk is Kivalina, the tiny community already so battered by climate change, it three years ago launched a lawsuit against two dozen oil and other fossil fuel companies seeking relocation costs.  That case was dismissed but a ruling…

“The truth is that our energy policy is improvised; it simply isn’t serious.” If you’re thinking that sounds like an apt criticism of U.S. energy policy over the last few decades, you may be surprised to learn that it’s actually a quote from a Spanish policymaker bemoaning his own country’s lack of a long-term, well-thought…

Biofuel saw another first on Monday as United Airlines made the first passenger jet flight in the United States using a blend of petroleum and fuel made from algal oil. But how does the airline industry feel about getting a government push to go green? Amid plenty of celebration over biofuel demonstrations – which have…

Comments Off on As Population Tops 7 Billion, Time to Revisit Climate Approaches

The world population reached seven billion people around October 31, according to United Nations estimates. The actual date is a bit fuzzy, but the milestone has nonetheless had great symbolic power, triggering a stream of articles on population issues. Nicholas Kristof, in the New York Times, argued family planning is the solution to many of…