Archives for November, 2011

Comments Off on Climate Advocates Seek Small Steps at COP17

Diplomats from 194 nations converged on Durban, South Africa, this week, kicking off two weeks of climate negotiations in the United Nations’ 17th annual Conference of the Parties, or COP17. The discussions seek to advance the Kyoto Protocol, which was adopted at COP3 in Kyoto, Japan, to fight global warming by requiring nations to lower…

Comments Off on Google Ends a Renewable Research Project

Google is renowned (and sometimes ridiculed) for its willingness to allow a vast herd of esoteric projects to roam its offices, but inevitably there is a culling. Among several victims announced today: Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal (RE<C), a project largely focused on advancing a type of concentrating solar power technology known as power tower.…

Comments Off on Can Obama Go Back to Political Base(ics)?

President Obama made a smart move this month by putting the Keystone XL pipeline project into the deep freeze. It had been poor politics for him — and it would have been even worse policy for the country, especially when you consider the aggressive retooling of our world energy sources demanded by the International Energy…

Comments Off on Communities Skip Washington for Green Action Locally

With political gridlock preventing politicians in Washington, D.C. from reaching agreements on, well, anything, it’s easy to imagine the entire country is suffering from a similar political lockdown. However, municipalities across the country are coming together and moving ahead in America’s clean energy discussion. One way they’re doing it: building a new generation of green…

Comments Off on “Cooking Shouldn’t Kill”

If you don’t see the map, click here Every year, 2 million people die from a killer in the kitchen: their cookstoves. A new report from the UN Foundation says the toxic smoke from these crude devices cookstoves can lead to child pneumonia, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and heart disease, as well as…

Whether you view the six-week stretch between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day as a license for gluttony or as a treacherous onslaught of health-jeopardizing temptations, you’ll find no shortage of media advice on how to make the most (or the least) of the season. That advice, particularly in America, typically revolves around food. But as…

PV Solar Report is out with an analysis [PDF] — done with solar installer SunRun — that says home solar installations are more a middle-income pursuit than something for the wealthy. The industry-watcher says “nearly two thirds of California home solar installations in 2009, 2010 and 2011 year-to-date have been in zip codes with median…

High electricity costs have troubled Puerto Ricans for years, but the proposed solution from the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) has raised concerns among citizens and environmental groups. The $450 million Via Verde project calls for a 92-mile natural gas pipeline carrying natural gas from the island’s main plant in the south to other…

Welcome to the world we’re building by default. Or, to be more precise, welcome to the world that other countries are building while we stand by squabbling and splitting hairs. One of the first things students in business schools and public policy institutes learn is that refusing to make a decision is, in fact, a…

Three scientists walk into a hearing room … Seriously. This week I was on Capitol Hill talking about global warming with Richard Muller of the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (BEST) project and Ben Santer of the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The Congressional briefing was organized by Congressmen Ed Markey (D-MA) and Henry Waxman (D-CA), who…