Archives for March, 2011

Comments Off on Adapting to Climate Change: What Can We Do Now?

Post by Charles E. Cooke Deputy Director, Energy Institute The University of Texas at Austin Congress has reached what amounts to a stalemate in its consideration of climate change legislation, and it’s not clear how long this self-imposed hiatus will last. Proponents of a cap-and-trade approach to limiting CO2 have failed to make a compelling…

Among the challenges facing technicians struggling to contain the meltdown at the Daiichi Japanese nuclear power units is getting enough water to cool them down. In Japan’s case, the overheating was caused by explosions triggered by the earthquake. Nuclear—as well as fossil-fuel and biomass-fired and some renewable energy systems are impacted by changes in ambient…

Comments Off on Building a Clean and Reliable Energy Future: Natural Gas and Renewable Energy

For the past 35 years, the U.S. energy supply condition can be described as “precarious”, at best. But, over the past 5 years the Energy Sector in the US has been undergoing unprecedented change, spurred by a number of factors including a revolution in new energy technologies, rapid shifts in consumer attitudes, and the discovery…

Comments Off on Aspen Commission: Amid Climate Change, Arctic Cooperation Urgently Needed

The loss of Arctic sea ice has done more than herald the extent of global warming. It has opened up the prospect of new shipping routes and new access to natural resources. As the ice has retreated, nations and private interests have advanced on the wild, remote region that affects the world–both as home to…

Nuclear Crisis in Japan

A game-changer or the price of doing business? At first there was the shock — the unbelievable devastation wrought first by Japan’s largest recorded earthquake (recently upgraded to a magnitude of 9.0) and then by the tsunami. Then, as the focus shifted to the daunting cleanup and recovery, another crisis hit — this one at…

The disaster in Japan, which threatens to worsen as the country’s officials struggle to contain what is being called the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl meltdown 25 years ago, is having repercussions on nuclear policy worldwide. On Monday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced a three-month moratorium on extending the operation periods for its nuclear…

For those who always suspected that the automakers could produce a more fuel-efficient car if they wanted, well, you’re right, and the proof is going on sale this year. We’re not talking about electrics, although they’ve been getting all the attention in green circles lately. We’re talking about old-fashioned internal combustion engines in perfectly conventional…

Comments Off on Catastrophe After Japan’s Earthquake

Update: Japanese officials said Saturday that radiation levels within one reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are now 1,000 times above normal, and some radiation has leaked outside the plant. Though evacuation of local residents has been expanded, officials said the leak posed “no immediate health threat.” (Read more at The New York…

Comments Off on How to Feed the World’s Energy Poor

This is the second installment of a group blog by Yale students.  Multi-disciplinary and across the university, this blog aims to bring you different perspectives on a common problem. This week’s topic: Some 1.5 billion people around the world live without electricity, another 1 billion people have unreliable power, and nearly half the global population…

Ethanol’s gotten a bit of a bad rap here in the States of late, largely due to the billions of dollars of federal subsidies that are paid to the oil companies each year to blend this renewable domestic fuel into our gasoline. There’s been plenty of rumblings from Washington to up the percentage of Ethanol…